Ukraine war latest live: Putin’s time ‘running out’ as cancer-riddled Russian despot ‘more PARANOID than ev… – The US Sun

ukraine-war-latest-live:-putin’s-time-‘running-out’-as-cancer-riddled-russian-despot-‘more-paranoid-than-ev…-–-the-us-sun

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PUTIN IT ON
  • 16: 51 ET, May 22 2022
  • Updated: 16: 52 ET, May 22 2022

RUSSIAN President Vladimir Putin is reportedly on constant watch by a "team of doctors" as his condition rapidly deteriorates.

Putin's rumoured health struggles will see him lose control of the Russian government, an ex MI6 agent said.

As reports that the tyrant is is suffering from cancer abound, ex-spy Christopher Steele claims the Kremlin is in "increasing disarray and chaos"

These reports follow a series of public appearances that Putin has missed, feeling suggestions that he is in a worse condition everyday.

Steele went on to say that, even when Putin is present he provides "no clear political leadership."

Suggestions that Putin is sick have been around for some time, with the past five years of his leadership being littered with mysterious absences.

Follow our Russia-Ukraine live blog below for up-to-the-minute updates...

  • ‘Cancer-hit’ Putin’s TV appearances ‘pre-recorded to hide absence’

    THE recent TV appearances of "cancer-stricken" Vladimir Putin have been staged to hide his week-long absence, Kremlin insiders have claimed.

    The claim raises speculation about the Russian President's health amid rumours he is battling cancer.

    A source has suggested that Russian media have used pre-recorded footage to show Putin in meetings held in the past week.

    According to the General SVR Telegram channel, his trusted aide Nikolai Patrushev - a former FSB chief - is now in virtual control of the Kremlin, and is the recipient of top-level briefings that would normally go direct to Putin.

    In its latest post, the channel-which is reportedly run by a Kremlin insider- said key figures believe Putin to be terminally ill which has altered the dynamic in Russia.

    His absence “since Tuesday” cannot be verified but the channel said his staff “show pre-recorded videos of his meetings”.

  • WHO warns Ukraine faces health emergency caused by 'devastating' war

    The "devastating" Ukraine war loomed large Sunday as the World Health Organization opened its main annual assembly, threatening to overshadow efforts on other health crises and a reform push aimed at preventing future pandemics.

    "The consequences of this war are devastating, to health, to populations, to health facilities and to health personnel," French President Emmanuel Macron told the UN health agency's 75th World Health Assembly.

    In a video address, he called on all member states to support a resolution to be presented by Ukraine and discussed by the assembly Tuesday, which harshly condemns Russia's invasion, especially its more than 200 attacks on healthcare, including hospitals and ambulances, in Ukraine.

    "Health must never be a target," Swiss Health Minister Alain Berset told the assembly at an opening ceremony featuring interventions from five presidents and a number of government ministers.

    The resolution will also voice alarm at the "health emergency in Ukraine", and highlight the dire impacts beyond its borders, including how disrupted grain exports are deepening a global food security crisis.

  • Russia-backed mayor of Ukraine nuclear plant town wounded by explosion

    The Russian-appointed head of the occupied Ukrainian town next to Europe's largest nuclear power plant was injured in an explosion on Sunday, a Ukrainian official and a Russian news agency said.

    Andrei Shevchuk, who was appointed mayor of Enerhodar following the Russian army's occupation of the town, was in intensive care following the attack, Russia's RIA news agency reported, citing a source in the emergency services.

    "We have accurate confirmation that during the explosion the self-proclaimed head of the 'people's administration' Shevchuk and his bodyguards were injured," Dmytro Orlov, who Ukraine recognises as mayor of the town said in a post on the Telegram messaging app.

    Enerhodar is a town with a pre-war population of over 50,000. Many residents work at the two power plants located next to the town, one of which is the Zaporizhzhia Nuclear Power Plant, the largest nuclear power station in Europe. Ukraine has previously complained that Russia's occupation of the plant raises the risk of a nuclear disaster.

  • Director Oliver Stone says Putin possibly invaded Ukraine ‘because he lost touch’ with people

    Concerns about Putin’s health were sparked during the pandemic, as his deep isolation led to speculations he may be suffering from another medical condition.

    He then imposed strict quarantine rules to his visitors who were forced to isolate for two weeks and pass through an elaborate disinfectant spraying machine before meeting him in person.

    Explaining why Putin may have misjudged the invasion of Ukraine, Stone speculated that “perhaps he lost touch – contact – with people”.

    It was not clear if Putin was getting the correct intelligence, he admitted. 

    “You would think he was not well informed perhaps, about the degree of cooperation he would get from the [ethnic Russians] in Ukraine…

    “That would be one factor, that he didn’t assess the situation correctly.” 

    It could also be that his “isolation from normal activity” and no longer meeting people “face to face” due to health concerns for Putin over Covid may have led to errors. 

  • Russia to halt gas supplies to Finland

    Russia yesterday said it would stop providing natural gas to neighbouring Finland after the Scandinavian country applied for NATO membership & refused to pay supplier Gazprom in rubles.

    Following Russia’s February 24 invasion of Ukraine, Moscow has asked clients from “unfriendly countries” — including EU member states — to pay for gas in rubles.

    It is being seen as a way to sidestep Western financial sanctions against its central bank.

    Gazprom said in a statement Saturday that it had “completely stopped gas deliveries” as it had not received ruble payments from Finland’s state-owned energy company Gasum “by the end of the working day on May 20”.

    Gazprom said it had supplied 1.49 billion cubic metres of natural gas to Finland in 2021, equal to about two thirds of the country’s gas consumption.

    However, natural gas accounts for around eight percent of Finland’s energy.

  • Russia presses Donbas as Ukraine takes centre stage at Davos

    Russian forces pursued their bombardment of frontline Ukrainian cities on Sunday, seeking to gain military momentum as Kyiv's diplomatic counter-offensive targeted the world's business and political elite gathering in Davos.

    Shelling and missile strikes hit Kharkiv in the north, and Mykolaiv and Zaporizhzhia in the south, while eight civilians were killed on the eastern front in the Donbas, Ukrainian officials said.

    Three months after launching their invasion, Moscow's forces are focused on securing and expanding their gains in the Donbas region and on Ukraine's southern coast.

    Ukraine's parliament voted on Sunday to extend martial law for a further three months through to August 23.

    Kyiv, meanwhile, is rallying international support and receiving Western weapons supplies, even if EU powers are struggling to agree on expanding sanctions to Russia's huge energy exports.

    Poland's President Andrzej Duda was to address the Ukrainian parliament and meet President Volodymyr Zelensky later Sunday, a day ahead of the Ukrainian leader's Davos videoconference.

    "He will in particular pay homage to those who, in defending Ukraine, are fighting to defend Europe," Duda's adviser Jakub Kumoch told the news agency PAP.

  • PM writes letter to 'strong & dignified' children of Ukraine

    Boris Johnson has penned an emotive letter to the children of Ukraine, commending them for holding their heads high in the "toughest of times" and reassuring them they are not alone.

    The Prime Minister said he was "very sad" to see youngsters absent from the streets and parks of Kyiv when he visited the Ukrainian capital last month, adding: "I cannot imagine how difficult this year must have been for you."

    But he said the children must bear two things in mind - that they should be "immensely proud" and they have "millions" of friends around the world.

    "When your president showed me around Kyiv last month, the absence of children and young people on the streets and in the parks made me feel very sad," he wrote.

    "Since the invasion many of you have been forced to flee your homes. You have left behind family, friends, pets, toys and all that is familiar, seeking refuge in underground stations, distant cities, even other countries. I cannot imagine how difficult this year must have been for you."

    Mr Johnson said the children should be proud of their country, their parents, their families, their soldiers, and "most of all" themselves.

    "Many of you have seen or experienced things no child should have to witness," he wrote.

    "Yet, every day Ukrainian children are teaching all of us what it means to be strong and dignified, to hold your head high in even the toughest of times. I can think of no better role model for children and adults everywhere."

    The PM said the children may be separated from their friends at home but they have "millions of others all over the world", including in the UK.

    "We fly Ukrainian flags from our homes, offices, churches, shops and playgrounds, even from my own roof in Downing Street, where the windows are filled with sunflowers drawn by British children," he wrote.

    "Our young people are painting your flag in their classrooms and making blue and yellow bracelets in support of your country."

    He added: "I believe, like your president, that Ukraine is going to win this war. I hope with all my heart that, one day soon, you will be free to return to your homes, your schools, your families.

    "And whatever happens, however long it takes, we in the UK will never forget you, and will always be proud to call you our friends."

  • Russia’s ‘unstoppable’ Satan-2 nuke

    Just days ago, Russian state TV said Britain could be bombed “back to the stone age” in ten minutes using Putin‘s “unstoppable” 7,000mph hypersonic nuke missiles.

    A Kremlin mouthpiece threatened to use Moscow’s new Zirzon weapon system to plunge the country into permanent darkness by wiping out 50 or 60 power stations.

    Politician Aleksey Zhuravlyov and another TV propagandist Dmitry Kiselyov have previously suggested striking Britain with Satan-2.

    Zhuravlyov threatened to nuke Britain with its Satan-2 hypersonic missile in 200 seconds and obliterate Finland in just ten.

    Rogozin has also warned that NATO countries can be destroyed within half an hour in a nuclear attack.

    Meanwhile, Russian state TV also threatened to wipe “boorish Britain” off the map for supporting Ukraine.

    And Putin has warned he will use nuclear weapons against the West if anyone interferes in Ukraine.

  • Zelenskyy promises to grant Polish citizens right to live in Ukraine

    Polish citizens in Ukraine will be granted the same rights that Ukrainian refugees in Poland are currently receiving.

    Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy announced the new laws on Sunday during a visit to Kyiv by Polish leader Andrzej Duda.

    Poland has granted the right to live and work and claim social security payments to over 3 million Ukrainian refugees fleeing Russia's invasion of Ukraine.

    Earlier on Sunday, a Ukrainian ruling party lawmaker said that Zelenskyy had announced the imminent tabling of a parliamentary bill to give Polish citizens "special legal status" in Ukraine.

  • EU membership for Ukraine will take '15 or 20 years', says French minister

    A bid by Ukraine to join the European Union could not be finalised for "15 or 20 years," France's Europe minister said Sunday.

    The minister poured cold water on President Volodymyr Zelenskyy's hopes for quick entry to the bloc in the wake of Russia's invasion.

    Clement Beaune told Radio J: "We have to be honest. If you say Ukraine is going to join the EU in six months, or a year or two, you're lying."

    "It's probably in 15 or 20 years, it takes a long time," he added.

  • Everything YOU need to know about Russia’s invasion of Ukraine

    Here are the key questions answered regarding Russia's brutal invasion of Ukraine.

    • Why is Russia invading Ukraine?
    • Will the UK go to war?
    • How can I join the Ukraine foreign legion?
    • What can I do to help Ukraine?
    • Who is Ukraine’s president Volodymyr Zelensky?
    • How much gas does the UK get from Russia?
    • Is Russia a part of Nato?
    • Does Russia have nuclear weapons?
    • Why is Ukraine not in Nato?
    • How big is the Russian army?
    • What is Article 5 of the Nato treaty?
    • What is the Minsk agreement?
    • Which countries were in the Soviet Union?
    • What does the Z mean on Russian tanks? Meaning behind symbols explained
    • When will the Russia-Ukraine war end?
  • Russia employs over 50 Syrian bomb specialists to help with Ukraine invasion

    According to reports, Scientists with connections to the Syrian military’s infamous barrel bombs have joined forces with Russia.

    The specialists have likely been tapped in order to aid in Russia's brutal bombing campaign of Ukraine.

    This violence comes as President Zelensky called on Russia for "diplomacy" in order to end the war.

  • Putin followed by 'team of doctors' at all times, says ex-MI6 agent

    Following reports of the tyrants rapidly deteriorating health, an ex-MI6 agent has revealed that he is being tailed at all times by a "team of doctors".

    As the war in Ukraine intensifies, Putin has become visibly weaker, missing a number of key engagements.

    Christopher Steele, an ex-spy, added that even when healthy, Putin provides "no clear political leadership."

  • Help those fleeing conflict with The Sun’s Ukraine Fund

    PICTURES of women and children fleeing the horror of Ukraine’s devastated towns and cities have moved Sun readers to tears.

    Many of you want to help the five million caught in the chaos — and now you can, by donating to The Sun’s Ukraine Fund.

    Give as little as £3 or as much as you can afford and every penny will be donated to the Red Cross on the ground helping women, children, the old, the infirm and the wounded.

    Donate here to help The Sun’s fund

    Or text to 70141 from UK mobiles

    £3 — text SUN£3

    £5 — text SUN£5

    £10 — text SUN£10

  • Heroic Zelensky meets with Portuguese Prime Minister

    The Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky, left, can be seen greeting Portuguese Prime Minister Antonio Costa as the country seeks aid in its efforts against Russia.

    The now-iconic leader has called on Russia to engage in peace talks, claiming only "diplomacy" can end the conflict.

    Today, Polish President Andrzej Duda will speak in Kyiv, becoming the first world leader to do so since Russia's invasion.

    Ukrainian Presidential Press Office via AP)

    Ukrainian Presidential Press Office via AP)
  • Fears grow regarding fate of 2,500 POW

    Russia has claimed to have taken approximately 2,500 prisoners of war from from the besieged Mariupol steel plant, leading to growing fears regarding their fate.

    These worries have been compounded following comments from a Russian general that each of these prisoners would face tribunals.

    Russia has now declared full control of the steal plant, which for weeks was the centre of an intense and bloody battle between the two forces.

  • Putin promises to bolster Russia’s cyber security

    Russia’s president, Vladimir Putin, has claimed that the frequency of cyberattacks on the country by what he called foreign “state structures” had increased several times over.

    “Targeted attempts are being made to disable the internet resources of Russia‘s critical information infrastructure,” Putin said.

    He added that media and financial institutions were among those that had been targeted.

  • Just 10 weeks of food left, Ukraine war impacts global wheat supply

    Reports have emerged that Europe has just 10 weeks worth of wheat left, following Putin's brutal invasion of Ukraine.

    A spokesman from the UN described this as a "once in a lifetime occurrence".

    Ukraine has long been known as the Breadbasket of the world, with this invasion halting all wheat production.

    Gro Intelligence chief executive Sara Menker told the UN’s Security Council: “Without substantial immediate and aggressive coordinated global actions, we stand the risk of an extraordinary amount of both human suffering and economic damage.

    “This isn’t cyclical, this is seismic. It’s a once-in-a-generation occurrence that can dramatically reshape the geopolitical era.”

  • Polish President to address Ukrainian parliament

    Andrzej Duda, the President of Poland, will address the Ukrainian parliament today.

    He will become the first world leader to do so since Russia's invasion began.

    The President's office said: "On Sunday, in the Verkhovna Rada in Kiev, he will deliver the address as the first head of a foreign state since the outbreak of the war."

  • Kyiv will not make concessions for Moscow, Zelensky advisor says

    The Ukrainian leadership is currently seeking peace talks with Russia.

    However, the country will not concede to any of Russia's demands, according Mykhailo Podolyak.

    The leading Ukrainian advisor noted that if they allow Russia to get what they want, the war will never end.

    “The war will not stop [after concessions]. It will just be put on pause for some time,” Podolyak, Ukraine’s lead negotiator, explained to Reuters on Saturday.

    “They’ll start a new offensive, even more bloody and large-scale.”

  • Russia’s ‘unstoppable’ Satan-2 nuke

    Just days ago, Russian state TV said Britain could be bombed “back to the stone age” in ten minutes using Putin‘s “unstoppable” 7,000mph hypersonic nuke missiles.

    A Kremlin mouthpiece threatened to use Moscow’s new Zirzon weapon system to plunge the country into permanent darkness by wiping out 50 or 60 power stations.

    Politician Aleksey Zhuravlyov and another TV propagandist Dmitry Kiselyov have previously suggested striking Britain with Satan-2.

    Zhuravlyov threatened to nuke Britain with its Satan-2 hypersonic missile in 200 seconds and obliterate Finland in just ten.

    Rogozin has also warned that NATO countries can be destroyed within half an hour in a nuclear attack.

    Meanwhile, Russian state TV also threatened to wipe “boorish Britain” off the map for supporting Ukraine.

    And Putin has warned he will use nuclear weapons against the West if anyone interferes in Ukraine.

  • Zelensky calls for 'diplomacy' to end Ukraine War

    As fighting continues in the across Ukraine, President Volodymyr Zelensky has called for "diplomacy".

    This plea comes amid deadlock talks between Kyiv and Moscow.

    “The end will be through diplomacy,” he told a Ukrainian television channel. The war “will be bloody, there will be fighting but will only definitively end through diplomacy”.

    “There are things that can only be reached at the negotiating table,” he said.” We want everything to return (to as it was before)” but “Russia does not want that”, he said, without elaborating.

    While Ukrainian authorities remain hopeful of peace, talks with Russia have not officially took place since April 22.

  • Putin promises to bolster Russia’s cyber security

    Russia’s president, Vladimir Putin, has claimed that the frequency of cyberattacks on the country by what he called foreign “state structures” had increased several times over.

    “Targeted attempts are being made to disable the internet resources of Russia‘s critical information infrastructure,” Putin said.

    He added that media and financial institutions were among those that had been targeted.

  • Russia to halt gas supplies to Finland

    Russia yesterday said it would stop providing natural gas to neighbouring Finland after the Scandinavian country applied for NATO membership & refused to pay supplier Gazprom in rubles.

    Following Russia’s February 24 invasion of Ukraine, Moscow has asked clients from “unfriendly countries” — including EU member states — to pay for gas in rubles.

    It is being seen as a way to sidestep Western financial sanctions against its central bank.

    Gazprom said in a statement Saturday that it had “completely stopped gas deliveries” as it had not received ruble payments from Finland’s state-owned energy company Gasum “by the end of the working day on May 20”.

    Gazprom said it had supplied 1.49 billion cubic metres of natural gas to Finland in 2021, equal to about two thirds of the country’s gas consumption.

    However, natural gas accounts for around eight percent of Finland’s energy.

  • Help those fleeing conflict with The Sun’s Ukraine Fund

    PICTURES of women and children fleeing the horror of Ukraine’s devastated towns and cities have moved Sun readers to tears.

    Many of you want to help the five million caught in the chaos — and now you can, by donating to The Sun’s Ukraine Fund.

    Give as little as £3 or as much as you can afford and every penny will be donated to the Red Cross on the ground helping women, children, the old, the infirm and the wounded.

    Donate here to help The Sun’s fund

    Or text to 70141 from UK mobiles

    £3 — text SUN£3

    £5 — text SUN£5

    £10 — text SUN£10

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