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The ACT opposition has called for an independent review into the release of a spreadsheet which contained details from 30,000 workers' compensation claims dating back to the start of self government. Deputy Opposition Leader Giulia Jones, has written to the ACT's health services commissioner, Karen Toohey, calling for an urgent investigation into the release of the data. Mrs Jones wrote to the commissioner to formally complain about the release of the information under the Health Records (Privacy and Access) Act. "While it is not certain, I believe the nature of the data released may fall within the definition of 'personal health information' in the Act and therefore be subject to the Act," Mrs Jones wrote. "Specifically, I believe the level of detail in the information disclosed allows it to be readily connected with the specific individuals. Moreover, given the data's connection with individuals' personal health status, I believe it is personal information within the meaning of that Act." The ACT government on Thursday said it would conduct an internal review into the release of the data, which was in a spreadsheet posted online as part of a tender process in 2018. The Canberra Times was able to identify individuals from the data contained in the spreadsheet and people familiar with the workers' compensation system in the ACT said they could also easily link information to individuals they knew or had worked with. READ MORE: But the government was unconvinced the release of the information - which included details of claims and payout costs, along with occupation details, employer and date of injury - amounted to a privacy breach. Special Minister of State Chris Steel told the Legislative Assembly on Thursday the privacy officer at the Chief Minister, Treasury and Economic Development directorate would conduct a review. There is no timeframe for the review and the government would not commit to releasing its findings before it was completed. Mr Steel said the the government would act on its findings. Mrs Jones said in her letter to Ms Toohey she thought the internal review was not an appropriate way to respond to the publication of the data. "I believe that this approach is entirely inadequate, particularly given the grave nature of the data released, both in terms of the number of records and the highly personal nature of the information," she said. Our journalists work hard to provide local, up-to-date news to the community. This is how you can continue to access our trusted content:

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The ACT opposition has called for an independent review into the release of a spreadsheet which contained details from 30,000 workers' compensation claims dating back to the start of self government.

Deputy Opposition Leader Giulia Jones, has written to the ACT's health services commissioner, Karen Toohey, calling for an urgent investigation into the release of the data.

Mrs Jones wrote to the commissioner to formally complain about the release of the information under the Health Records (Privacy and Access) Act.

"While it is not certain, I believe the nature of the data released may fall within the definition of 'personal health information' in the Act and therefore be subject to the Act," Mrs Jones wrote.

"Specifically, I believe the level of detail in the information disclosed allows it to be readily connected with the specific individuals. Moreover, given the data's connection with individuals' personal health status, I believe it is personal information within the meaning of that Act."

The ACT government on Thursday said it would conduct an internal review into the release of the data, which was in a spreadsheet posted online as part of a tender process in 2018.

The Canberra Times was able to identify individuals from the data contained in the spreadsheet and people familiar with the workers' compensation system in the ACT said they could also easily link information to individuals they knew or had worked with.

But the government was unconvinced the release of the information - which included details of claims and payout costs, along with occupation details, employer and date of injury - amounted to a privacy breach.

Special Minister of State Chris Steel told the Legislative Assembly on Thursday the privacy officer at the Chief Minister, Treasury and Economic Development directorate would conduct a review.

There is no timeframe for the review and the government would not commit to releasing its findings before it was completed. Mr Steel said the the government would act on its findings.

Mrs Jones said in her letter to Ms Toohey she thought the internal review was not an appropriate way to respond to the publication of the data.

"I believe that this approach is entirely inadequate, particularly given the grave nature of the data released, both in terms of the number of records and the highly personal nature of the information," she said.

Our journalists work hard to provide local, up-to-date news to the community. This is how you can continue to access our trusted content: