Books as the main source of learning.

books-as-the-main-source-of-learning.

As you well know !

I really hate watching courses online because I zone out a lot. But I like reading books.

Do you think substituting online courses with books is a good idea?

Log in or sign up to leave a comment

level 1

· 1d · edited 22h

Helpful

Security Engineer

So far I've gotten a sec+, net+ and CISSP from textbooks alone (with minor suppliments for my CISSP via a web series)

Sybex and McGraw-Hill make great textbooks. Read each chapter, do the end of chapter quiz, learn why your wrong answers are wrong.

Sybex usually has a voucher for a big test bank online (CISSP had like 1400 questions, did them all)

For my Net+ and Sec+ I used McGraw-Hill.

For my CISSP I used both Sybex and McGraw-Hill.


The benefit is that a text book is like $40 and I went at my own pace and actually learned the topics.

Couldn't imagine paying thousands of dollars for a one week cram course. Don't think I'd have taken the time to explore each concept

level 2

Ironically I did my Sec+ half from a physical text book/half from the virtual textbook (much easier to navigate and compile notes from, IMO), while in a 2 week cram course. I basically read the book and took notes the nights before the topics would be discussed in class, and then reviewed everything the second week. Would highly recommend!

level 1

I’ve found I learn faster and more efficiently with reading. A few people on my team are the same.

If you don’t like watching the videos, don’t. There are SO many excellent books out there to study with.

level 1

It's all about how you learn. Reading a book is just as good as watching a video course as long as you retain the information. I prefer reading books as I zone out while watching videos as well, and have passed multiple exams off of just solely reading books.

In my experience, reading books provide a lot more information, examples, and context. However, because of this, books usually take longer for me to get through but usually result in better retention of the information. However, I have noticed when I don't understand a concept presented in a book, a video usually helps clear things up and make the concepts "click" as videos are pretty much simplified overviews of the concepts and provide a quick and different phrasing/point of view.

level 1

The thing I hate more than anything are the youtube videos trying to show you some programming trick that take ten times longer to watch than reading a well-written text description. These are an incredibly bad way to convey information.

level 1

I didn't watch a single video for CCNA, Security +, CCNA Security. If books work, read them.

level 1

I aslo use reading as my main source. I do supplement with videos. If you have a tendency to zone out during lectures or videos, make yourself take notes. I find it helps tremendously for both paying attention and retaining the information and I never review the notes.

level 2

Agree with regards to taking hand written notes - improves the comprehension big time. Even if one never comes back to read those

level 1

There are a lot of studies out there that show watching a video or a lecture is one of the least affective ways to learn. I go to text resources first and then watch a video if I want to see what the book is describing.

level 2

There is a study (I can not find the link) claiming each individual has own preference for ideal “information ingestion” types. Some people are more visual (prefer video) come prefer audio only. Some need books. Also the brain is elastic and will adopt to accommodate the study routine you are practicing. Try finding you own ratio of text/video/audio/hands-on this is the key.

level 1

Do you think substituting online courses with books is a good idea?

Yes. Written material will be a primary source of cutting-edge stuff. Blogs and as much as I really hate to say it... Twitter... are really good resources for finding interesting stuff and engaging with stuff happening right now. Powerpoints and speeches at events are still usually pretty relevant, but generally take more effort than just documenting on a blog or making a short 15 second clip briefly talking about it. Essay style videos and books will take even longer because you need to edit what you say. Depending on who the audience is for, these could take longer or less time. Lectures at schools take the longest and can be 2-3 years out of date.

Each documentation type here goes through a different level of filter to try and make the content easier for someone to understand. The audience for each area here is totally different. People sitting in a college class are probably totally new and will be overwhelmed if they try to read a professional's blog because they are not going to spend much time explaining knowledge you should already know. Speeches at events I rate higher than books because the speeches on tech stuff is normally going to be held at events such as DEFCON or Black Hat, which is obviously full of nerds that don't need to know what a jpeg is.

I hope this explains why books are pretty important. You're fine, but make sure you are careful in what kind of book you choose. A book made for beginners probably wouldn't be for you 2 or 3 years down the line when you've done lots of research.

level 1

I do. And so do the 100 Barnes and Nobles left in this country. Notice how the only section present in all of these is "IT Learning".

level 2

614 are still in operation as of 2020. Just saying.

level 1

Definitely! OReilly has a lot of good books

level 1

Ive done both yes reading is alot easier.

I find if i watch udemy vids with a notepad and paper tho helps

level 1

A big yes from me. I get 90% of my learning from books (and doing actual work).

level 1

Substituting? No. Supplementing? Yes. A book isn't just another version of a course, and the two are not generally interchangeable.

level 2

Having spent way too much time getting university degrees, I say it depends.

If the course involves a lot of interaction and discussion, then books aren't a substitute.

But online courses are very passive. The only advantage over reading on your own is getting a certificate to say you completed a course.

Watching videos bores me to tears. I get more out of reading a book, can read it at my own pace and switch between different chapters as needed. That's hard to do with a video.

Being able to read a lot and grok what's happening is an important skill for anybody working in IT and security.

level 2

Online courses are my supplement.

level 2

Blogs are just books with a lot less editing. I guarantee the cutting edge stuff starts from someone getting curious, finding something weird, and documenting it.

level 1

Cissp major study was done on books..As you said I zone out if i watch videos more than 15 mins

In the end, you know, I just wanted to mention that camDown has a modern UI, that is secure and has the improved features that you need and that's the no lie!